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March 8, 2014

Andy Murray


A. MURRAY/L. Rosol
4‑6, 6‑3, 6‑2

THE MODERATOR:  Questions, please.

Q.  How difficult is it to get into a rhythm against somebody who plays like that?
ANDY MURRAY:  I felt I was in a decent rhythm in the middle of the second set.  Here I have always kind of struggled at the beginning of the tournament with, you know, I don't know if it's the conditions or, you know, whatever reason it is, but I have never really started this tournament that well.
I have always struggled, especially in the first round.  So, yeah, just have to try to find a way to get through.

Q.  Do you think of that when you're in this tournament and get down in a match, or are you able to set that aside and just focus on today?
ANDY MURRAY:  I think it's important sometimes to think about it, because, you know, when you're not expecting it to happen and then it does, that's when it can kind of ‑‑obviously it can take you by surprise and you might panic a little bit or worry.
But I don't feel like today‑‑ you know, I was a set and a break down.  I got broken three times in a row the end of the first set, beginning of the second.  You know, I just kind of kept going and found a way to win, which is always the most important thing.

Q.  You did well at this tournament, didn't you, at the start of your career, and then the last few years it's been a bit more of a struggle.  Is it somewhere you feel you might have done a bit better?
ANDY MURRAY:  I don't know, to be honest.  I mean, you know, some tournaments you feel very comfortable and some years you will feel better than others.  You just have to try and make the most of what you have got.  Sometimes, you know, I have taken quite long breaks after the Australian and trained and maybe come in with not, you know, enough matches, but physically I was in good shape.
You know, often I play well in Miami just after that, so, you know, maybe this year will be different.  I'll play a few more matches to get ready here, and hopefully that will help me.

Q.  When he's thumping forehand winner after forehand winner, do you get the suspicion that in a minute they are going to start to fly not where he wants them to fly but you'll get yourself back into the groove again?
ANDY MURRAY:  Well, you need to be the one that makes him miss balls.  You know, when the ball is sitting there, he hits it extremely well.  He hits it hard.  He puts pressure on you.  Because, you know, if you don't get the ball (radio interference) of the court, he'll dictate the point.
So I think if you watch, you know, the sets and saw, you know, the things I did differently in the second and third sets, I was dictating a lot more of the points.  I would use my forehand a lot more.  I was a lot more sort of active on my feet in between shots to look for the, you know, the right shots, look for my chances to come into the net, as well.
You know, you have to make him miss balls, because when he's in the middle of the court dictating it's very tough.

Q.  Along with Rafa, Novak, and Gaël, you came out there and made a statement about the terrible situation over in Ukraine.  Could you just talk about that and why did you decide to do it?  Just reflect on that.
ANDY MURRAY:  Well, I mean, I spoke about it a couple of days ago in my press conference, and Dolgopolov asked me to do it.  Obviously when we're traveling, you know, we do tend to follow the news and see kind of what's going on.
Yeah.  You know, as athletes and tennis players, we obviously travel around the whole world.  I was saying the other day, There is probably players playing from 80, 90 countries here; it's a truly global sport.
Any time we can sort of help support one of the other players or, you know, whether it's a situation like that, I think we do a pretty good job of it.

Q.  You have a place in Miami.  You just played in the Garden in NewYork; here you're on the West Coast; you won at the Open; you spend a lot of time in this country.  Do you feel in a way that ‑‑do you feel comfortable here in some way?  Is it a second home or is it just in and out of your life, so to speak?
ANDY MURRAY:  No, I love the States.  I have loved it since the first time I came for the Orange Bowl when I was 11 years old.  I just enjoy the positivity of the people here.  You know, wake up at 6:00 in the morning and go to Starbucks and, you know, the person that's serving you just genuinely seems happy to see you.  They are awake and just very positive, have a positive outlook on life.
It's not the case everywhere.  That's why I always enjoy coming here and why I spend my off seasons training here and why I have made Miami my sort of second home, because people are very positive.

Q.  Another political question.  Obviously it's going to be an important year for Scotland.  I was just wondering if you've thought about how you're going to approach getting asked questions about the referendum and whether you plan to take a position?
ANDY MURRAY:  Yeah, I said, I mean, I will take a position, but, you know, I'm not really one ‑‑I can't vote.  I'm not allowed to vote, so my thoughts on it aren't that relevant, because, you know, I can't vote myself.
And, yeah, I wouldn't personally choose to make my feelings on something like that public either because not a whole lot of good comes from it.  I don't know a whole lot about politics, and I have made that mistake in the past and it's caused me a headache for like seven or eight years of my life and a lot of abuse.
So I wouldn't consider getting involved in something like that ever again.

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