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AL CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES: TIGERS v RED SOX


October 15, 2013


Doug Fister


DETROIT, MICHIGAN: Game Three

Q. What did you learn about watching the first two games and watching today's game, what will we learn about pitching to the Red Sox?
DOUG FISTER: I think a big thing is the fact that both teams never say die. They compete until the last out and it showed that Boston did that the last game, obviously. So we've got to go out there and we've got to play every out and make sure that we get everything done.

Q. You had a really good start at Fenway Park in September. What do you remember about that outing, what worked for you, and how could you apply that for tomorrow?
DOUG FISTER: I think a lot of it was the fact of executing. Keeping the ball down, mixing pitches and not get in any sort of routine. Their hitters are very smart, very intelligent. We've seen each other a lot. It's a matter of going out again and executing and making sure that each one of us do our jobs.

Q. What's it like pitching in this rotation, and how does your style complement the guys that you follow or precede and vice versa?
DOUG FISTER: I think a big part of it is the fact that we do it altogether, whether it's Ver or Scherz or anybody else on the mound. Everybody is out there trying to help each other, and trying to go through pitch sequences, and picking apart each guy's delivery. Different things. Whether it's a running game or how to attack a certain hitter, we're always trying to communicate with each other and trying to help each other. That's a huge part.
It's an honor for me to be a part of this rotation. We've got guys that have succeeded to such great levels, Anibal who did the ERA award this year, Justin and Max, alone, you know, but it's just an honor for me to be here.

Q. You mentioned a bunch of, keeping up with the Joneses, Verlander, Scherzer, Sanchez, Porcello. When you see all these guys doing all these fantastic things on the mound, you're a competitor. How do you keep yourself in check or go about approaching it and not trying to keep up with the Joneses, so to speak?
DOUG FISTER: I think that a lot of that is the fact of coming to terms with what you do and do it well. I'm not a strikeout guy. I'm a guy that goes out and gets ground balls. That's my job. That's what I want to do. I want to go out there and get bad contact as much as possible in the early three pitches of the count. And I have to rely on the team. And that's where we're all at, we rely on each other. And to go out there and do our job and put up zeroes, and that's our biggest goal, we're going to go out and put up a W.

Q. Since you've been here, what have you learned about Justin Verlander from watching him pitch and being around him in the clubhouse as far as what makes him an exception?
DOUG FISTER: The way he prepares. He goes out there every day well versed in every category. He sits and watches a lot of film, goes over with Jones, the pitching coach, all the hitters and the strategy, what they want to do. They always know what they want to do two steps ahead. And I think that's a big thing. It's a matter of him, he's got a knack of turning it up when he needs to and being able to lock in and execute.

Q. When you were a little boy and going through high school or at some point in time, when did you really believe you had a legitimate shot at being a Major League baseball pitcher?
DOUG FISTER: You know, it was always something I wanted to do, obviously, growing up. It was a part of my goal going through college. It was just a matter of hey, I want to play baseball, but I am going to get my education, also. If I can get my education paid for by playing baseball, that's even better. Once I was able to do that, obviously I just tried to keep continuing into pro ball and see where it could take me.

Q. Because of the other guys that you mentioned, Scherzer, Verlander, Anibal, you're not a guy who's normally talked about very often, the No. 4 starter in this rotation. Do you like flying under the radar? Do you think that's a good thing that a guy like you could be overlooked?
DOUG FISTER: I think my perception of it is the fact that I'm here. I want to be here. I want to be a part of the team. When I'm asked to pitch, that's when I go out there, whether I'm in the bullpen or in the starting rotation. That's my thing. I want to be a part of the team. I want to go out there and perform with the best of them.
Whatever that takes, whatever that calls for, that's where I want to be. Obviously I look up to those other guys. They've performed very well this year and in years past. Again, it's something special for me to be a part of.

Q. Verlander talked a little bit the other day about Shane Victorino being so close to the plate. What are your thoughts about being so close?
DOUG FISTER: We're never looking to hit them, by any means. But I'm still going to pitch inside. That's what I do. I throw a sinker and try to keep it down. Obviously numbers‑wise this year I've hit a few that have gotten away from me. And guys that do stand on the inside of the plate, I think they know that. And it doesn't change from hitter to hitter who it is. It's a matter of we're going to make our pitch. And that's kind of the way it goes.

FastScripts Transcript by ASAP Sports




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