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U.S. OPEN


September 1, 2013


Andy Murray


NEW YORK CITY, NEW YORK

A. MURRAY/F. Mayer
7‑6, 6‑2, 6‑2


THE MODERATOR:  Questions, please.

Q.  After you came out in the second set, the match really seemed to change.
ANDY MURRAY:¬† It was very tricky ‑ well, it was tough conditions, not tricky.¬† It was very, very humid.¬† Yeah, with the way that he plays, it was a tough match, especially the beginning.
But, yeah, started the second set well.  Started hitting the ball a little bit cleaner, was more aggressive after that, and finished it well.

Q.  Some suggested you were having trouble breathing with the humidity.
ANDY MURRAY:  I was struggling breathing for most of the match.  I just went to the toilet.  It was quite a long set.  When it's that humid, you tend to try and take on as much fluid as you can.

Q.  When the weather is as iffy as it looks out there, do you find yourself checking the sky during a match?  Could you also talk about the implications of having a roof put over Ashe?
ANDY MURRAY:  When you say 'looking iffy'?

Q.  Rain in the forecast.
ANDY MURRAY:  Well, not today really.  I wasn't thinking about that today.  But, yeah, I mean sometimes the skies have looked like that for the last five, six hours.  Hadn't really changed that much.
Sometimes you are conscious of the rain.  Sometimes you can feel it coming a little bit with a bit of drizzle.  You will think about it.  But not today.
I think with the roof, I mean, I don't know how much difference it makes to the players.  There's 128 players in the draw.  It will help 10, 15 players, but it doesn't help everybody.  But for the tournament, it's great.  It's great for TV.
It's great for people that have tickets to come and watch, as well.  And it means also that the tournament, you know, most likely will get finished on time, which hasn't been the case I think like three of the last four years, going on to the Monday.
Q.  You didn't look very happy in the first set.  Was that just the conditions?
ANDY MURRAY:  Yeah, it was tough, tough conditions.  Not easy to play when it's like that.
Q.  You do a lot of training in Florida.  You're used to difficult conditions.  How did it compare to that?
ANDY MURRAY:¬† I mean, you can get used to something, and then if you aren't in those conditions for five weeks or four weeks ‑ it's been four and a half weeks since I've been in Miami ‑ that doesn't always just stay with you.
Suddenly it's extremely humid and you're playing right in the heat of the day.  That takes time to get used to.

Q.  Last changeover before you finished it off you hung an ice towel around your back.  You acted as if you had been stabbed in the back.
ANDY MURRAY:  It wasn't the ice towel.  I reached back to grab it and I felt my left forearm a little bit.  I basically went down, yeah, to stretch out.  It wasn't to do with the ice towel.

Q.  Will it be strange to play an opponent who's last name is not Mayer?
ANDY MURRAY:  No, I don't think it will be.

Q.  What are the odds of that?
ANDY MURRAY:  Yeah, I mean, they're probably fairly low.  But it's probably happened quite a few times, I would have thought.

Q.  You tweeted about Dan's match.  You managed to watch a bit of it.  He talked afterwards about feeling like he was earning your respect because he changed his attitude.  Is that something that you've definitely seen, that he's sort of grown up?
ANDY MURRAY:  Well, I always liked him.  I mean, he's a fun guy to be around.  He's funny.
But, yeah, it can be just frustrating sometimes when someone has that much ability.  You really just want to see them play the way that they can.  You know, you don't want really guys to sort of finish their careers regretting, you know, not putting in 110%.
He could make a really good living for himself playing tennis.  He could have some big wins.  Five, six weeks ago, you know, if someone had said Dan Evans is playing Tommy Robredo on Armstrong, who is going to win?  You would absolutely say, There's absolutely no chance.  That's three straight sets for Robredo.
He's turned it around.¬† From what I've heard, he's been working extremely hard ‑ from the coaches and fitness trainers that have been around him.¬† He's on a bit of a roll right now.¬† He played well yesterday.¬† I watched almost every point yesterday in the evening.
He very nearly won that match.  He almost turned it around.  The big problem was the second set for me, not what happened at the end of the fourth set, because Robredo was struggling physically.
If he could have just maybe put in a little bit more effort in the second set, he could have outlasted him.

Q.  Bode well for Davis Cup, as well?
ANDY MURRAY:  Yeah, I mean, if he plays like that it's good for everyone.  For Davis Cup, of course it helps the more guys you have playing well and able to compete with, you know, top 100, top 50, top 20 players.
When we have home ties, on the right surface for him, he can compete with most guys in the world.  It will be a good test for him on the clay.

Q.  What do you think about what Lleyton Hewitt is doing this week?
ANDY MURRAY:  Yeah, well, it's great.  Yeah, I mean, I practice with him quite a lot.  Spent quite a bit of time with him over the grass court season.
He works hard.  He loves competing.  You know, he hasn't been fit.  He's been injured for the last few years.  So now that he's fit again, he has a chance to win those matches.
He's a great player.  People are quick to write guys off and not kind of remember how good someone like Hewitt was at his peak.  He finished No.1 in the world two times at the end of the year, won a couple of Grand Slams, and has been in the finals of others.
When he's fit and healthy, he can compete with everybody.

Q.  Last few days, a lot of people talking about a possible Federer/Nadal quarterfinal.  A lot of attention on this Williams/Stephens match.  Do you quite like that, the fact that you are perhaps being slightly a bit more under the radar than you would've been otherwise?
ANDY MURRAY:¬† Again, I mean, I haven't really noticed any of the years thinking that I'm front‑page news.¬† It's very different to Wimbledon, obviously, for me.¬† Yeah, in some ways it's nice, but I don't really think it makes a whole lot of difference to how I play.
I've played some of my best tennis at Wimbledon over the last five, six years.  It's more the buildup to the tournament that I've always said is hard.  Once the tournament gets started, it's a bit easier.

Q.  I believe you have been visiting a mental conditioner in Fort Lauderdale; is that correct?
ANDY MURRAY:  A mental conditioner?  A sports psychologist?

Q.  Yes, that will do.
ANDY MURRAY:  I haven't seen a sports psychologist since March.

Q.  Since March?
ANDY MURRAY:  Yeah.

Q.  May I have the name, please?
ANDY MURRAY:  I know her first name is Alexis.

Q.  You don't know the second name?
ANDY MURRAY:  No.

Q.  I've only been covering for a few months.  It strikes me you get asked more personal questions than any player I've seen, mostly from the media from your country, about toilets and mental conditioners.  Do you feel like that, that you get sort of a microscope over you that maybe other players from other places do not?
ANDY MURRAY:¬† Yeah, I mean, a lot of times in matches, like at the Australian Open this year, you know in the second‑set tiebreak a feather came onto the court.¬† A lot of people were asking me after the match and making out like that feather was the reason for why I went to the toilet before the fourth set of the final last year, and that was the reason why.
Everyone is always looking for the reasons why.

Q.  Do you think that happens more with you than others?
ANDY MURRAY:  I don't know.  I don't sit in the others' press conferences.  I know the real reason why I've done well and win is because I work hard and I train hard.  You know, all those other things are just extra bits and pieces.
But the reason why guys do well is not when they go to the toilet or whether there's a bit of rain or feathers or whatever.  It's down to hard work and having good people around you.

Q.  Denis Istomin next.  He's coached by his mum.  That seems unusual on the ATP Tour.
ANDY MURRAY:  Yeah.  I mean, I think on both tours it is.  There's not loads of people that get coached by their parents.  A lot of them do from a young age, but not so much when they're on the tour.
Obviously it works for him.  Technically he's very sound.  He's a good player.  He hits the ball very flat.  He served extremely well today I think in his match.  I saw some of the stats at the end.
Yeah, he's played well.  He had a very good match with Novak in Montréal.  He's had some good wins this week, as well.

FastScripts Transcript by ASAP Sports




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