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INTERNATIONAL TENNIS HALL OF FAME INDUCTION CEREMONY


July 13, 2013


Christopher Clouser

Phil De Picciotto

Greg Drysdale

Cliff Drysdale

Rod Laver

Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe

Charlie Pasarell

Ion Tiriac


NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND

THE MODERATOR:  In 1881, this Newport Casino hosted the first United States National Tennis Championships, now known, of course, as the US Open.  In 1954, through the dedicated work of Candy and Jimmy Van Alen, the USTA sanctioned this beautiful facility as The National Lawn Tennis Hall of Fame.
Starting in 1975, individuals from the worldwide tennis community became eligible for enshrinement into the International Tennis Hall of Fame.  Today, we will honor several individuals with the highest honor that there is in the game of tennis.  These very special players and contributors exemplified the greatest traditions of our sport, perseverance, integrity, athleticism, and sportsmanship.  Their accomplishments both on and off the court are the very reason why we were here to pay tribute to them today with the highest and most prestigious award in the game of tennis.
Very shortly, the men and women we honor today will be officially enshrined as Hall of Famers, a title that is only bestowed on the very best and the very few.
There are some very special guests that are seated here on the Bill Talbert Center Court that have come here to help us salute our 2013 enshrinement class.  First, it is my pleasure to introduce a number of distinguished Hall of Famers from previous induction classes who grace us with their presence in Newport today, and we will not ask you to hold your applause until the end.  You can feel free to applaud after each and every one.
First, this son of Philadelphia won Wimbledon in 1953 and the US Championships in 1954 to go with five grand slam doubles titles, four of them with our good friend and former President of the Hall of Fame, Tony Trabert.  A U.S. Davis Cup star and team captain inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1971, now 89 years young, please welcome back Vic Seixas.
This New Jersey native won both Wimbledon and the Australian Championships in 1951, despite never taking a tennis lesson in his life.¬† A three‑time winner of the U.S. indoor championships and a 1976 inductee into the Hall of Fame, Dick Savitt.
This Aussie was a winner of 11 major singles titles, and we use the term major title and not grand slam title, because as our friend Bud Collins correctly reminds us, you only win the grand slam when you win all four major titles in the same year.  But, of course, this man did that, and he did it twice.  His parents named him Rodney George, but he'll forever be the Rock Hampton Rocket from the class of 1981, the great Rod Laver.
In his early playing days, this Spaniard once said grass is just for cows.  Well, he changed his stance after winning Wimbledon in 1966.  He also won Roland Garros twice in the U.S. Championships in 1965; he was Spain's Davis Cup captain, and the winner of the Demonstration Gold Medal at the 1968 Olympics, from the class of 1984 Manolo Santana.  Maybe he doesn't like grass once again.
This man is a hero to everyone in our game, especially those in my line of work.  He's been a guardian of our sport for the past half century, a brilliant journalist, and author and broadcaster, the undisputed global historian of the game of tennis and inductee to the Hall of Fame in 1994, welcome back to Newport, the always colorful, Bud Collins.
She is a five‑time Wimbledon doubles champion, twice a singles finalist at the US Open, and perhaps more importantly, a trailblazer in the areas of gender equity and open tennis.¬† Just 5'2" tall, but boy was there all kinds of game in that little frame, Hall of Famer class of 1954 Rosie Casals.
This woman made the US Open final in 1978, and was one half of the most lethal doubles team in women's tennis history, seven Australian Open titles, four at Roland Garros, five at Wimbledon, and five at the US Open, plus an Olympic Gold Medal and now one of the most respected broadcasters in our sport, from the class of 2002, Pam Shriver.
He was the junior champion at Australia, Roland Garros, and Wimbledon.  He had a remarkable pro career throughout the '60s and continued to impact the game after his playing days, executive director of the ATP, founder of the magnificent tournament on Key Biscayne in Miami, Hall of Fame class of 2005, Butch Buckholz.
Billie Jean King called him a national treasure, and she was correct.  He is the dean of modern tennis photography, nominated for a Pulitzer Prize in 1955, capturing the images of our sport for over half a century.  Hall of Fame class of 2007, seated in the chairman's box today, welcome home Russ Adams.
This Aussie won 11 mixed doubles majors titles, including the mixed grand slam in 1967.  Also won the men's doubles at the Australian Open with Ken Rosewall in '72, the US Open doubles with John Newcombe, member of the class of 2010, Owen Davidson.
In 1973, she was hired as the first employee of the WTA, and for 35 years, she was the driving force behind the growth of professional women's tennis and she is still going strong.  A member of the class of 2011, the year she stole the show from some guy named Agassi, welcome back Peachy Kellmeyer.
A three‑time All American at Yale, U.S. Davis Cup player and captain, he helped establish the ATP in the early '70s with the help of his good friend Arthur Ashe, and he revolutionized the way pro athletes conduct business, now the vice chairman of the Hall of Fame, inducted in 2009, Donald Dell.
Finally, this California native won the US Open in 1971.¬† Won Wimbledon in 1972; he was a five‑time major doubles champion, and has served American tennis in multiple leadership capacities, Davis Cup player, Davis Cup captain, Olympic coach, and now the President of the International Tennis Hall of Fame, member of the class of 1987.¬† Won't you please welcome, Stan Smith.
I'd also like to take a moment to recognize the families and special friends of the class of 2013.  They have seen them at their greatest, and perhaps their not so greatest.  They've supported and encouraged their tennis dreams and other dreams and celebrated their accomplishments from the very beginning.
I'd like now to ask the families and special friends seated on the court of our inductees to please stand so we may thank and recognize you.  Please stand.
Now, ladies and gentlemen, it is my pleasure to introduce the chairman of the International Tennis Hall of Fame, please welcome to the stage, Christopher E. Clouser.
CHRIS CLOUSER:  Thank you, Brett.  Welcome one and all back here to the International Tennis Hall of Fame.  Like to take a moment and recognize a very important group to the International Tennis Hall of Fame.  These individuals are the backbone of our organization which gives so much and largely without being asked, whose dedication to the growth of this beautiful complex knows no end.
They provide leadership to the one and only International Tennis Hall of Fame and Museum as it has grown into the marvelous institution it is today.  Their dedication and perseverance and preservation and history of the sport of tennis both past and present is unparalleled.
The Hall of Fame has grown and flourished through the years because of their commitment, guidance, and partnership with RhodeIsland, the City of Newport and the Hall of Fame staff.  Ladies and gentlemen, please join me in recognizing the executive committee, the Board of Directors in Mark Stenning, as we celebrate Mark's 33 years with the Hall of Fame.  Would you all please stand and be recognized.  Thank you.
The very highest honor and recognition that can be awarded to a volunteer of the International Tennis Hall of Fame is to be designated a Life Trustee.  There are only 12 individuals who have been awarded this honor.  Some of the outstanding people committed to the Hall of Fame are like Bud Collins, Bumpy Frazier, George Gowan, Billie Jean King, Rod Laver, Bill Phillips, Dick Savitt, and Tony Trabert.
On behalf of the Executive Committee I'm pleased today to announce the appointment of three new life trustees.¬† The museum would not be what it is today without her.¬† She's been a museum chair, a museum co‑chair, secretary of the board and officer of the board and continues in that role today.¬† Please join me in congratulating, and please stand Mrs.Peggy Woolard.
An incredibly generous philanthropist who has made us all think and do better, and she's watching today, an incredible person, Executive Committee and board member, Ms.Rosalyn "Roz" Walter.  Hello, Roz, and congratulations.
Next in the final life trustee, you've served the Hall of Fame for 30 years.  In my opinion, one of the finest chairs of the Board of Directors.  He's also chaired the Executive Committee, and currently chairs the nominating committee.  As he stands, please congratulate our final new life trustee, Mr.John Reese.
Now for the induction of the Hall of Fame class of 2013.  For 59 years the International Tennis Hall of Fame has preserved the history of our great sport and continued to honor the legacies of the individuals who embody its most important traditions.
Today we'll begin with a Master Player Category:  Mrs.Thelma Coyne Long of Australia.  In her honor, would you please rise for the playing of the Australian National Anthem.  [Anthem playing]
Thelma Coyne Long, 94 years young could not join us here today, but I know she's watching from Sydney, Australia.  To accept on her behalf, we're very honored to have with us today, arguably one of the greatest players to ever play the game of tennis.  What is not arguable is that he is one of the true gentle persons and greatest persons both off and on the court.  He is the example of true class and an outstanding example of those who play today, and to all those who may play this game some day.  Ladies and gentlemen, Mr.Rod Laver.
ROD LAVER:  Thank you for those kind remarks.  It is my pleasure to accept this reward on behalf of Thelma Coyne Long.  Her remember remarkable career lasted more than 20 years, starting in 1935 and finishing in 1958.  Her remarkable accomplishments, given the limits on Australian women's players and what players faced during that time are amazing.
She won a total of 19 grand slam titles.  Thelma holds a record 12 Australian National Championships, now known as the Australian Open, doubles.
In 1952 she completed an Australian triple, winning the singles, doubles, and mixed‑doubles competition.¬† Thelma now‑‑ Thelma won titles in 16 other countries along her tennis career.¬† It is amazing.¬† In 1941, during World War II she joined the Red Cross as a transport driver and in 1942 she joined the Australian Women's Army service and rose to the rank of captain.¬† Thelma was awarded the Australian War Medal in recognition of her service throughout World War II.¬† I'm proud to be here to accept this award for Thelma, a very deserving and wonderful lady.¬† Thank you.
CHRIS CLOUSER:  Rod, when I called Thelma to notify her of her election, she said that's very nice and thank you, but it's about time.
ROD LAVER:  That's exactly true.
CHRIS CLOUSER:  So it gives me great pleasure on behalf of the board and Executive Committee to present this enshrinement certificate to Rod Laver on behalf of Thelma Coyne Long, Thelma Coyne Long is a member of the International Tennis Hall of Fame.  Congratulations.
ROD LAVER:  I might add I saw Thelma play in 1956 and 1958, and she's just a wonderful person and quite a tennis player.
CHRIS CLOUSER:  Also in the Masters category, we're posthumously inducting six extraordinary players who helped shape the history of tennis.  Their playing careers and these great tennis greats arranged from the late 1880s to the 1940s, with the majority of their careers ending prior to World War II.
Today we honor and recognize Daphne Akhurst from Australia, James Anderson from Australia, Wilfred deley from Great Britain, Blanche Bingley Hillyard from Great Britain, Hilde Krahwinkel Sperling from Denmark, and Charlotte Cooper Sterry from Great Britain.
Now from the contributors category for three of our inductees.  First, in honor of Ion Tiriac, please stand for the Romanian national anthem.
To present Ion Tiriac, we are very honored today to have with us here, the Honorable United States Senator, United States Special Ambassador, United States Special Envoy and a great friend and supporter of the game of tennis, please join me in welcoming the honorable Senator George J. Mitchell.
SENATOR MITCHELL:  It would be difficult to describe adequately any person in just a few minutes.  Those of you who know Ion Tiriac are aware that given his colorful life, it's impossible, but I'll try.
All who enter this Hall of Fame have made major contributions to tennis.¬† Few have done so along and in so many ways as has Ion Tiriac.¬† Raised in poverty by a single mother in the mountains of Romania, he's truly a self‑made man who achieved great success in tennis, and in business.¬† His ferocious determination and his relentlessness to win were evident for all who saw him compete at the highest level of international tennis.
With Ilie Nastase, he won many doubles titles, including the French and Italian Open.¬† With Guillermo Vilas, he won many titles in North and South America.¬† He had a great Davis Cup career, winning 40 singles and 30 doubles matches.¬† In one four‑year stretch, he and Nastase led Romania to the Davis Cup finals three times against the United States.¬† And as evidenced by his remarkable athletic abilities, just a few years before that he played for the Romanian National Hockey Team against the United States in the 1964 Olympic games.
Later was a great promoter of Davis Cup in Germany as well as in Romania.  After his playing days were over, Ion continued in tennis as a coach, manager, and tournament owner.  He managed many great players including Nastase, Cilas, Goran Ivanisevic, Boris Becker and many others.  He's owned and run many tournaments in Germany, Austria, and now the Madrid Masters in Spain.
He also won many singles titles, but I want to close with a story about one he didn't win.  As you heard already in 1969, Rod Laver, one of the greatest players of all time, won the four grand slams for the second time one of the finest achievements in tennis history, but it almost didn't happen.  At the French Open that year in the quarterfinal match against Laver, Ion won the first two sets.  Rod came back to win the last three sets, and then went on to win the French Open and complete the second grand slam.
Many years later at Roland Garros with Ion and I asked him about that match.  At the beginning he said, the weather was good, the footing firm, and I took the first two sets.  Then, the weather turned , the court got slippery, and Laver pulled it out.  A month later I was at Wimbledon, and by complete coincidence, found myself seated next to Rod Laver.  Naturally I couldn't resist asking him if he remembered that match with Ion.  Oh, yes, he said.  I remember it very well.  At the beginning, the weather was  and the court was slippery, and Ion won the first two sets.  He said, then the weather cleared, the footing got firm, and I won the last three.
Well, most great athletes I've known have amazingly detailed and clear memories of the important events in their careers, and although Rod and Ion recall them, they did have slightly different recollections of the weather that day.  And as all the players here today know, a fraction of an inch here and there, a little rain, a let, a  call, a different history might have been written.
Ion, despite that loss, you are a winner.  Although the criteria for admission to the Hall of Fame are appropriately limited to tennis, it must be said of Ion Tiriac that his extraordinary success in tennis and in business has enabled him to devote much of his life to helping the people of his country in ways too many to describe here, often quietly and without publicity.
Ion has used his success in life to give many, many Romanians a chance to succeed in their lives.  Ion, as you enter the tennis Hall of Fame today, you earn our congratulations, but you already have earned our admiration because long before today, you have been a Hall of Famer in the game of life itself.  Ladies and gentlemen, Ion Tiriac.
ION TIRIAC:¬† Now what can I say after such a speech.¬† Now you understand why I am not a politician and simple human being an ex‑tennis player, an ex‑coach, an ex‑promoter, and present member of the International Hall of Fame.¬† I don't know who voted for me and who voted against me to be inducted today into the Hall of Fame, (indiscernible)¬† but so we don't have any dispute.
I don't know how Mr.President may have voted and I am not going to ask, anyhow, I believe without asking that he voted for me, maybe he could make up something from those three beatings that he gave me in the three finals of the Davis Cup and ruined forever my career as a tennis player.  I thank you not because you beat me, but what you have become in your second life.  Because I always say, always a champion, being a tennis player, being an athlete, being a football player or anything, he is loved by everybody.
Once you finish, always is going to be somebody who is jumping higher, and running faster or hits the ball harder.  And if that happens and after you stop you are still going to be respected, that is exactly what brings you to be successful in the second life.
All the time my family that for such a long time support me are present here.¬† I honor my son, I honor my daughter and their mother, Sophie, my sister that all my life was next to me, and my friends, that they are all in front of me.¬† I'm not going to number them, because they are too many, and I don't want to keep more time because McEnroe set up the 5‑minutes time for these speeches after his two hours and a half that he had.
George, I thank you very much.¬† I'm really not only pleased but honored for you presenting me for this introduction.¬† International Hall of Fame is very high.¬† Very well‑regarded and deserved so keep it.¬† Ion Tiriac member of the Hall of Fame, I don't think I deserve it, but I'm going to keep it.
The thing that I just want to come one second back to the match against his royal highness, Rod Laver.  That year was the first Open ever for his professional (no audio)  planned at Roland Garros, and the first Open amateurs with professionals and so on.  Who are the professionals they see supporting each other from before.  So, what happened?  They are seven professionals and one amateur.  They get less money, not because there was anything different from them.
In the quarterfinals, so I have to play Laver.  And Rodney said, you know something?  I believe that this year I am going to make the grand slam again.  Right now, a player that already made the grand slam and you are still on the court.  What do you have to do?  But then I didn't know how to play tennis, I never knew, I never learned, but I had two very good pair of legs, and I could run from here to New York and back.
So I run against Mr.Laver from A to Z, and I (no audio).  And I was thinking, listen, this guy maybe makes the grand slam.  It wouldn't be fair to beat him.  I don't say that I gave him the match, but I say that he didn't really beat me.  So, it's something between the two of us.  We're still great friends.  I respect him for a very, very long time in my book, you are the best player ever, and I don't want to compare.  It's impossible to compare.
I am very proud, and I thank you I was elected for the first time with my peers that put me here.  The guys that I share a piece of bread, sometimes, not all the time, even a little bit of butter.
I get to reach the first time when I won the US Open, the U.S. Senior and the French Open, and I get $100 for winning the title.  I believe that year you get $2000 at Wimbledon and I remember that.  (No audio).  Because Roosevelt won.  No, no, if you want to maybe you won it.  Not even the French one.  And they said, this is the check today.  We hope that next year it's bigger.  And you wonder if it's bigger the next year and the year after.  Only in my dreams.  We have excess of $10 million in prizes.  Where has this game has gone.  But the market can afford it.
If I look over my shoulder, I promise I don't regret one thing with my life, being a tennis player, a coach, a manager, a promoter, the way it was, and I am not jealous.  Let them make the tens of millions of a year, but they're never going to have the ties that we had and power here of tennis player.  Thank you.
CHRIS CLOUSER:  Stan, will you join me and please present Ion with his Hall of Famer plate.
Ion, on behalf of the Board and Executive Committee, we're happy to present this certificate which signifies your admission into the International Tennis Hall of Fame, congratulations.
Now to honor two of our contributor inductees, Cliff Drysdale and Charlie Pasarell.  I ask you to please stand for the national anthem of the United States of America.
Eric Clifford Drysdale.  I spoke with Cliff about his election in Melbourne, Australia this past January.  And I asked him who would be his presenter?  With no hesitation and proud look of a father he immediately said, my son, Greg.  And I'm pleased to welcome to the podium, that great son, Greg Drysdale.
GREG DRYSDALE:  Thanks, everybody.  That's very nice.  My father, in my humble opinion, is the best man I've ever met in all the ways that matter.  He taught me everything that I know that's worth knowing.  He's a great dad, and I'm very lucky.
But I've had to share him.  He's given his whole life to tennis, unreservedly, playing, promoting, organizing, and eventually broadcasting.  34 years he's been on TV, 34 years.  Johnny Carson wasn't on TV for 34 years.  That's a very long time and still going.
Where were you last week?  4th of July we could have been on the golf course, but, no, had to go to England again.  I was so happy when I heard that my father was being inducted into the International Hall of Fame, because I think it's the most magnificent way for all the great people in tennis that mean so much to him.  I think it's a way to express appreciation and affection for my dad for a lifetime spent to the sport.  So thank you all.
Thank you all very much, because personally, there is no possible way that I could ever thank my father for all that he means to me.  But I can try.  Thanks for all that you've done.  I love you.  Ladies and gentlemen, I give you Cliff Drysdale.
CLIFF DRYSDALE:  I just knew that I was not going to bawl like a baby, and I'm going to try my damnedest not to.  Greg, I hope that one day you realize how strong a human being, and how strong a personality you are.  To my wife, Deanna, she thinks this is all about history, and it's not.  It's about what's been past and what's going to come in the future.  Just one quick thought for you, DiAnna, and that is that these last years that we've been together, I've seen the world in a different light.  I know it's not just from the courts to the hotel anymore.  It's a much happier place than I ever thought it was before I met you, and I thank you for that.
I want to bring you to this spot that I'm standing right now because I'll never forget the time that Jimmy Van Alen who was responsible for the tiebreak and responsible and tried so many times to change the scoring system in tennis and succeeded, obviously.
But I had figured out a way to subvert his testament, so I was playing against some champ here on this court and figured out if I lost a couple points maybe even a game, that somehow I'd get to the semifinals automatically.  And poor Jimmy came on to this court, and he was livid.  I mean, his face, I thought he was going to explode.
The man that I was playing against was Butch Buchholz.¬† He's sitting up here on this stadium set‑up.¬† I want to apologize to Jimmy Van Alen and I want to apologize to you too, Butch, for that moment.¬† But I tell you the truth, you to me are like a¬† rash.¬† I can't get rid of you.¬† I mean, it started with the Handsome 8, then it goes to World TeamTennis, then you run the ATP, and then, I don't know.
Then you start the Lipton became Sony down in Miami, and just when I thought I was rid of you, I gave me a call and say would you come down, I'm managing this tennis club down here at the Ritz.  So I end up in the same city with you, and I have to continue to deal with you.  That was my opportunity to meet Don Henderson and he's here as well.  Donny is here somewhere right there in the front row, wife, Katie.
We've started this fine little business that continues to thrive, and I wanted you to know how much I appreciate you as a good friend.  There is another person here, couple others I wanted to recognize.  Gavin Forbes this year as well.  Put up your hand, Gavin.
His dad was my Davis Cup partner with South Africa back there in the '60s.  He wrote a beautiful book, and if anybody in this stayed jump has not read it, they need to get a copy of it.  It was called handful of summers, it was about the summers in the '60s, which were different and were maybe more fun.  Depends on how you look at it.  They were certainly different.  This is something that you should read.
You know that he wrote the book, gavin, what you don't know is that he said to me at a certain time, Cliff, you're that good that you're going to be able to play with the likes of Rod Laver.  I looked at him, thought he was crazy.  But it turned out that way, Rocket.  We played against each other a few times.  I didn't lose every one of them, you may or may not recall.  And there have been so many stories spoken about and written about you, that I'm not going to go into them.
But I will tell you that in Rome, the second week I was ever in Europe you were playing a match.¬† And suddenly the entire locker room, men's locker room was devoid of people, and the reason for that was because they were all there to go and watch you play.¬† You actually had a top‑spin backhand which was basically unknown at that time.
Sorry about the rain, folks.  Please feel free to put your umbrellas up.
One of those who would leave the locker room to watch the Rocket play was Charlie Pasarell.  And I would say about Charlie, that he is a dreamer.  He always was a dreamer.
When I would listen to him in those days, Charlie, when we talked about the ATP and forming the ATP, you came up with some cockamamy ideas in those days.  I used to think that you were nuts.  Fact is though that those ideas have translated into your great tournament that you created at Indian Wells, number one and the Super Nine, what was the Super Nine, and became The Masters 1,000 now.  Those were your ideas.  Don't let anybody in this room forget.
I wish Lamar Hunt was here, because they gave me the opportunity to bring my family over to the United States and to be honest with you, to be on very honest with you, I wanted to be an American more than anything from the time that I was knee high to a grasshopper.  I wanted to be in this country, and they helped that process which meant that I could bring my young kids, one of whom was sitting here now, and his sister, Kirstie, who is another light of my life, not able to be here, unfortunately, but she is in Texas.  She is watching us, and I want her to know how much I appreciate and love her.
The other thing that they did for me at WCT was they introduced me to this company called Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, now better known as ESPN.¬† And my career with ESPN was also much longer than my playing days.¬† I just wanted to recognize a couple of guys.¬† Jeff Mason is here.¬† He's been the longest guy that I've known.¬† He's made the trip down here.¬† Jed Drake who is a type‑A personality beyond belief, but we've learned so much, at least I have anyway from Jed.¬† You have Jamie Reynolds who tries to keep us announcers on an even keel, which is very difficult because we're all basically egomaniacs.
We have Caroline Davis who really runs the whole show.  Everybody thinks it's the suits that run it.  It's Caroline, in fact.  And Jason is the one who buys all the properties, Jason Bernstein.  Thank you so much, guys for the honor and privilege of joining me for this really special occasion.  The announcing family that we have are also here.  Patrick McEnroe has taken the trip with his family up here.  Chris McKendry is here.  Chris Fowler is here as well.  It means a lot to me that you guys have shown up here.  It means a heck of a lot.
Pammy Shriver is like my sister, so I don't even need to thank her.  We came to that conclusion a few years ago.  I want to recognize one other person before I stop and maybe try to help everybody get out of the rain, and that is Bobby Feller.  Bobby Feller has been a producer for tennis for as long as I can remember.  We've done a lot of things together over the years, Bobby.  He claims he knows what I'm going to say before I say it.
And I will tell you, Bobby, you're sitting in this group here in front of us as well, I know, I will tell you that I know what you are going to think before you think it.¬† So it's not just a one‑sided street here.
Finally, I want to recognize Mr.Chris Clouser.  He's had to sit here for what I hope is not more than five minutes, because that was my admission that that's as long as I had.  If he has listened for five minutes that's 4 minutes and 30 seconds longer than he's ever had to listen to me before, because he's got the attention span of a mosquito.  I really appreciate his help over the years, and his deep and abiding friendship.
It is a privilege and honor to be a member of the International Tennis Hall of Fame.  And from the bottom of my heart, I thank you.
CHRIS CLOUSER:  It's my honor to present this certificate to you, certifying your induction into the International Tennis Hall of Fame.  Ladies and gentlemen, Hall of Famer, Cliff Drysdale.
According to weatherman, Mark Stenning, we're going to need to take a short break here and we'll be back with you to proceed with the final two inductions.  Thank you.
(No Audio)
JEANNE MOUTOUSSAMY‑ASHE:¬† (No Audio) from 1971 to 1978.¬† He's always there to help in any efforts that will lift the game to greater heights.¬† Under his leadership as tournament director of what is now known as the BNP Paribas Open in Indian Wells, California.¬† The tournament has grown to the largest two‑week combined ATP and WTA tennis tournament in the world after the grand slams.
But for those of us who know Charlie, know the commitment that he takes most seriously is his commitment to his service of the family.¬† A commitment that he makes with love, and that he backs up with follow through and reliability.¬† When Charlie Pasarell gives you his word, his word is as good as gold.¬† In 1969, along with Arthur Ashe and Sheridan Snyder, Charlie co‑founded the National Junior Tennis League to provide inner city, underprivileged kids the opportunity to be exposed to and benefit from tennis.¬† Thanks to their efforts, thousands of kids have opted to stay off the streets and instead playing on tennis courts and staying in school.
The NJTL continues to be the largest grass roots tennis program in the United States, with over 950 chapters reaching 275,000 kids each year, kids who have gone on to become doctors, lawyers, teachers, engineers, accountants, business executives, tennis teaching professionals, coaches, including James Blake, and Rodney Harmon.
Some of you may know that Arthur Ashe and Charlie were not only roommates and teammates at UCLA, they were best friends.  If Arthur were alive today, he would be introducing Charlie.  I'll stand in his place and try not to cry, because I know Arthur would have been welling up with tears of joy for his dear, dear friend.  And I thank him for vindicating that line, because I'm sure that reign was definitely divine intervention from Arthur, but they were tears of joy, Charlie, tears of joy.
Thank you, Charlie, for including me in this wonderful celebration.  You are not only a great example of the athletic spirit, but also the quintessence of everlasting love, family and friendship.  It gives me great pleasure to introduce him with words that are now most fitting.  Ladies and gentlemen, Hall of Famer, Charles Pasarell, Jr.
CHARLIE PASARELL:  Thank you for those kind words.  It is very special and meaningful to me that you are the one presenting me into the Hall of Fame today.  Also, we are also proud of you for all the outstanding work that you are doing to reserve and promote Arthur's legacy to the Arthur Ashe Learning Center.  You're a wonderful person, Jeanne, and we love you.
Wow, standing here today on this court, I realize what a fortunate individual I am, and that I have been blessed with a wonderful life, a loving family and great friends.  I, and all of us who have had the privilege to stand on this court to receive an induction into the International Tennis Hall of Fame are fully cognizant that this honor could not have been achieved without the help, support, and encouragement of others.  So it is time for me to acknowledge and express my gratitude to those that helped me get here today.
I must begin with my family, and first and foremost, my mother and father, Charlie senior and Dora.  They are here today, ages 95 and 92 respectively.
Mother, father, to both of you, thank you for providing me and my brother's family with a loving home, a good education and introducing us to tennis at a young age.  Actually, both of my parents were accomplished tennis players in their own right.  My father won the Championships of Puerto Rico eight times, and my mother won it once.
So I grew up in a tennis playing family, and in 1965, the USTA, then the USLTA named our family Tennis Family of the Year, an award we cherished greatly because it involved the whole family.  I am also very fortunate to have met and married my sweetheart and wife of 42 years, Shireen.  Together we have raised two wonderful children, Farah and Charles.  They are also sitting with my parents over there.  Shireen, Farah and Charles, thank you for all the love and joy you have brought into my life.
I also would like to recognize my other family that is here today, my younger brother's family, and his lovely wife, Georgine.¬† My brother and sister‑in‑law, Frank and Marcy Crackhill, and their family, Frank, Hunter, Amara and Jarrod.¬† And my brother‑in‑law, Dr.George Fareed, and his two daughters, Lara and Martha, to all of you, thank you for being here today, and I love you all.
I must also express my appreciation to my tennis teacher and coach, Welby Van Horn who started teaching me at the age of 8.  And whatever success I might have achieved as a player, I owe mostly to him, and the sound fundamentals that he taught me.  So if you're watching, thank you for being my mentor and teacher.
To all of my friends from the ATP that I've had the privilege of serving with on the board for all of those years, Mark Miles, Mark Young, Larry Scott, Etienne de Villiers, and our recently deceased friend, Brad Drewett and many more, I'm proud of all the work we did to make this game just a little bit better.
Mark and Mark, I know you're here today, and thank you for being here and your support.
To my Indian Wells tennis tournament family that I've had the privilege to work with over 30 years, thank you for your devotion and hard work to make that event a great spectacle that it is today.  I am sure that with your continued work and direction and with Larry Ellison's support, it will grow beyond anyone's expectations.
Dee Dee, Peggy, Tom, it means a lot to me that you're here today.  Thank you for being here.  To all of my other friends that have traveled from California and elsewhere, thank you for your support.
This induction into the International Tennis Hall of Fame is indeed for me the ultimate honor and recognition that I can receive in the sport.  Just imagine to be included in this hall among so many legends and outstanding individuals such as Arthur Ashe, Billie Jean King, Jack Kramer, Poncho Gonzales, Tony Trabert, Chris Evert, Stan Smith, Butch Buchholz, all the great Aussies, Laver, Anderson, Newcombe, Roach, Stone, Rosewood, Davidson, and of course, my Davis Cup captain and great friend, Donald Dell.  It truly is a great honor and humbling experience.
These are individuals that I have admired for their accomplishments and contributions and with whom I've had the good fortune of sharing many wonderful experiences on and off the court.  They all have had without a doubt a positive impact on my life, and I am blessed to have them as my friends.
To the inductees of the class of 2013, Mrs. Coyne Long, Martina, and my two buddies and contemporaries Cliff and Ion, congratulations.  It is an honor to be in your company.
And Cliff and Ion, really, it's a little extra special for me to have been inducted in the Hall of Fame at the same time as the two of you.
Finally, to chairman Chris Clouser, President Stan Smith, CEO Mike Stenning, and the board of the International Tennis Hall of Fame, I would like to express my gratitude for this recognition and great honor that's been bestowed upon me today.  You have made me and my family very proud.  Thank you, and God bless you all.
CHRIS CLOUSER:  Charlie, on behalf of the board of the Executive Committee, it is my honor to present you with this certificate that signifies your induction into the International Tennis Hall of Fame.  Thank you.
Ladies and gentlemen, for the final induction, our final inductee for 2013.  In honor of Martina Hingis, would you please rise for the national anthem of Switzerland?
To present Martina, it is my distinct honor and pleasure to introduce and bring to the podium, a great leader.¬† President and co‑founder of Octagon, and a dear friend of Martina and supporter throughout her incredible career.¬† Please welcome Mr.Phil de Picciotto.
PHIL DE PICCIOTTO:¬† Martina, welcome to Newport.¬† You have accomplished so much since we first met when you were an 11‑year‑old surrounded by stuffed animals.¬† On your journey to get here, you won 81 tournament titles, including 15 grand slam titles.¬† You spent 209 weeks as the World's No. 1 ranked singles player, and you attained the rare status of holding the No. 1 ranking in both singles and doubles at the same time.
We loved watching you play.  You were always so natural and so authentic.  You treated us to a modern, yet classical and timeless style of tennis, with a blend of superb technique and artistry reflective of your Swiss and Czechoslovakian heritage.
Your extraordinary court sense enabled you to anticipate your opponent's next shots and strategies.  You creatively employed your feet, your hands, your head, and your heart.  Throughout, your coach and mother, Melanie, was a constant source of knowledge and support.  And in turn, you used what you learned to inspire others.  Players lined up for a chance to play doubles with you, and you won titles with 15 different partners.
You always went above and beyond in fulfilling your responsibilities toward tournament directors, WTA Tour officials, business partners, and those less fortunate than you.  Your openness and honesty with the media made their jobs easier.  Your integrity and fairness and consistency made the ITF better.  And no doubt in the years ahead, you will find many new ways to help the next generations of players and administrators and fans.  Martina, on this special day, the stage of the Hall of Fame is most deservedly yours.
MARTINA HINGIS:  Thank you, Phil.  Well, when I was 11 years old, also thanks to Phil I took my first private Jets trip from Switzerland to Prague, and thank you, Phil.
Ladies and gentlemen, first of all, I'd like to tell you how deeply I'm honored and moved to stand here in front of you today in this wonderful place with so much history.  I can only find the words to express the feelings that I have being now a member of such an elite group our sport has elected to represent millions and millions of people worldwide playing tennis.
I could repeat the words said so many times before here, our sport has given me everything in my life, and it would be the truth.  But maybe I can add something special, something to give you a little bit more insight about who I am and what this all means to me.
I was born behind the Iron Curtain, and my mother wanted to tear the curtain apart for me.  That is the reason I played tennis as a little girl.  In 1980, my mother had not many choices for giving me a better life and a chance for freedom to see the world.  She chose the game of tennis as a way out of the world and the prison we lived in, so thank you, mom.
She also gave me the name Martina after Martina Navratilova who was a great legend and a symbol of freedom in our country back in Czechoslovakia.
As the wall came down in '89, also, thanks to this great land of yours, I was already on the way to where life to get me, so thank you, mom, again, you gave me life, you gave me love, you gave me tennis.  You gave me everything you could give me.
Thank you, tennis.  You gave me the world, and now I honestly am out of words, because there are no words to explain what I feel as you chose to give me a place here for eternity.
When I was a little girl, I didn't know there is a Hall of Fame.  When I was at the top of my game, I did not know there was far more than sports.  As I stand here now in front of you, I am not sure if I deserve all of this, but what can I say more?  Thank you all, and I love you all.
Couple more words to the people that are here with me today.  My mother, Melanie Molitorová, and long-time family for me, the Yonex family, Mr.Ben Yoneyama and his wife.  We had a relationship for 20 years.  Thank you for coming today.
June, who I have known since I was a little girl as well.  Thank you for coming, and Leopoldo Gutierrez, who is now the owner of the Tonic tennis line that we make together, and he also has a great designer who designed this dress.  So whoever loves Tonic Tennis, please, you're welcome to shop it on Tennis Warehouse.  So, thank you, and enjoy this afternoon.
CHRIS CLOUSER:  Martina, on behalf of the Board of Directors and the Executive Committee, it is my distinct honor to give you this certificate, and certifies your induction into the International Tennis Hall of Fame.
Ladies and gentlemen, before we conclude our ceremonies, Cliff, Charlie, and Rocket on behalf of Thelma Coyne Long, Martina, and Ion, would you please take your victory lap around the court, so our guests here today can congratulate you on this honor.  If other Hall of Famers would follow, we'd appreciate it also for a victory lap, we'll be right back.

FastScripts Transcript by ASAP Sports




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