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BNP PARIBAS OPEN


March 16, 2015


Andy Murray


INDIAN WELLS, CALIFORNIA

A. MURRAY/P. Kohlschreiber
6‑1, 3‑6, 6‑1


THE MODERATOR:  Questions, please.

Q.  Well played.
ANDY MURRAY:  Thank you.
Q.  You were sort of cruising along happily and then you hit some obstacle and came out the other side.  What was the middle all about?
ANDY MURRAY:  Well, I think he definitely started to return better.  The game where I got broken, I played a few poor shots in that game, as well.  He obviously capitalized on that.
You know, it can happen in these conditions where it's so lively that you can miss‑time a few balls.¬† You know, if your footwork and your movement isn't quite as it should be, you know, you can definitely miss a few shots.
But apart from that, I thought I played a good match against a tough opponent who I think plays well in these conditions, and it was a good win for me.
Q.  What do you know about your next opponent, Mannarino?
ANDY MURRAY:  Well, I watched him play a few times.  You know, I have never practiced with him or played against him, but, you know, I know about his game.
I feel like I have an idea of what his strengths are, but obviously, you know, the way he plays against other players will be different maybe to how he plays against me.
You know, I'll need to work some things out for myself when I get on the court.  I would say I know his game fairly well.

Q.  How far do you think you can reach in this tournament?
ANDY MURRAY:  Well, I have no idea, to be honest.  I mean, try to win each match that I play.  I started the tournament well against two tough opponents, in my opinion, Kohlschreiber and Pospisil are good players, and I think I like these conditions.
It's been a good start, but I don't do that anymore.¬† I don't look ahead or think about winning events whilst‑‑ you know, in the third round or the fourth round.¬† It's just concentrate on the next match and try and beat whoever you are playing on that day.
Q.  What does it take to do well over here?  We have heard so much about the "tricky conditions," the way the court plays, and how it counteracts with the thin air and speed of the ball flying through the air.  What does it take to do well at this tournament?
ANDY MURRAY:  I haven't done that well, so probably not the best person to ask.  (Smiling.)
But I think, look, it can be tough.  The conditions from 11:00 in the morning are different to how they are at 2:00 in the afternoon.  Then at 5:00, 6:00 in the evening, the conditions are completely different again.
You know, the middle of the day I think is when most of the players have been just talking about how lively and how quick it is.  And it is.  But then in the evenings the ball bounces a lot lower.  Even when I was warming up for my match today at 9:30, 10:00, it's much, much easier to play.  It's slower.
The court is not as hot, and, yeah, it's easier to control the ball.  So I think when you are playing in those matches during the heat of the day, you need to trust your shots.  You need to go after them, because if you back off and try and sort of guide the ball in these conditions, it doesn't work.
So you need to try to trust your shots as much as possible.  And, yeah, keep accelerating on the ball, because that gives you a little bit more control and spin.

Q.  Does that have something to do with the balls?  Rafa said the other day he criticized the balls being used here.  Does it have something to do with the liveliness?
ANDY MURRAY:  I don't know if it's only the balls.  I think it's probably a combination of a few things.
You know, for me, the balls don't feel as lively.  Like I said, when I play at 9:30 in the morning or in the evening they don't feel as lively, but then during the day it's ridiculous how high they bounce and how quick they move through the air and jump off the court.
So I don't know if it's just the balls.¬† I think it's a combination of things.¬† I know they have tried to make some changes to the Head or the Penn balls ‑‑
(Cellular interruption:  Dog barking ringtone.)
ANDY MURRAY:  That's a bad ring tone.  (Laughter.)
They said they made some changes to the balls.  I don't know how much of a difference they made.

Q.  You mentioned the conditions several times.  Even in your match you had wind near the end.  I noticed one time it blew the umpire's microphone.  It kind of got strange out there for a little while with the wind swirling and the heat, didn't it?
ANDY MURRAY:  Yeah, that's the thing, as well.  Always when you play in big arenas, when a bit of wind does get in, it's much stronger than it appears.
So, yeah, when you add that into the conditions it makes the ball even tougher to control.  So I have been pretty happy with the way I have struck the ball.  I hit the ball very clean considering in my first two matches, which is a good sign.

Q.  You have been here a little while now.  What have you been able to do over here in any sort of off time?
ANDY MURRAY:¬† I haven't done loads, to be honest.¬† I mean, most of the days‑‑ you know, like right now, when I finish doing this, I'll go back to the hotel, get some physio treatment, massage and stretch, and then maybe have a snooze and then go out for dinner.
It's not like when we finish our matches at 3:00 we have, you know, the rest of the afternoon to do stuff.  You have to recover.  You know, this period here, it's a long few weeks, so you're also conserving your energy is very important, as well.
Yeah, I've gone out for dinner most of the evenings, but haven't done much else.
Q.¬† As Americans, sometimes we don't understand these things, but have you ever thought about ‑‑you have done so much for British tennis and a great humanitarian.¬† Have you ever thought of the fact you could be knighted while you're still an active player?¬† Have you thought about that?¬† Is that something that would interest you?
ANDY MURRAY:  I got asked about it a lot after I won Wimbledon.  But, yeah, the last couple of years it's not something that I would everthink about at all during the year.  (Smiling.)  I don't sit and think about something like that.
So, yeah, no, I haven't thought about it much at all.

Q.  It was a curiosity.  I don't understand these things being an American.  But if you were knighted as a player, would that mean when you're at Wimbledon, everyone would have address you as Sir Andy?  Like Roger and Rafa, which would be something.
ANDY MURRAY:¬† No, to be honest it's obviously ‑‑in my view rather than the title, it's more the sort of recognition of what you've done in your field during your career.
I mean, I wouldn't want or expect people to use that term ever towards me.  It's more just the recognition of what you've done for your country that that's what's nice about it for me.
But I can't imagine ever being addressed that way.
Q.  So not even making the British media say Sir Andrew?
ANDY MURRAY:  Maybe with some of you guys, but certainly not my peers.  Look, who knows if that would ever happen, anyway.

FastScripts Transcript by ASAP Sports




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