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WESTERN & SOUTHERN OPEN


August 13, 2014


Samantha Stosur


CINCINNATI, OHIO

S. WILLIAMS/S. Stosur
7‑6, 7‑6


THE MODERATOR:  Questions, please.

Q.  Quite a different look from last week.  Very close match.
SAMANTHA STOSUR:  Yep.  Yeah, it was a whole different match than last week.  I mean, last week she absolutely punished me and I didn't feel like I played that great.
But she absolutely took advantage of all of that really in that match, and I really felt behind the eight ball straightaway.
Then going into this one I actually followed through with all of the things I wanted to do last week.
Yeah, it was a huge improvement.  Yeah, really close match.  Really good quality match.  I'm really pleased with the way I played.  I'm disappointed when you have those couple of set points and don't go through and at least win that set to take it into three.
But I gave myself every chance to try and get through that one.  She came up with some really great stuff when it really counted.

Q.  What stands out to you?
SAMANTHA STOSUR:  I think I thought I served pretty well.  To not have any breaks throughout that whole match, I think there was only one break point that both of us maybe got a chance.
But, yeah, just being able to each game step up to the line and saying, Yep, I'm going to do it again; I'm going to do it again.
I guess I gave myself a few opportunities in that first set to break.¬† I only got one break point, but had like Love‑30 and couple of little chances there and she came up with something good. ¬†And that's fine.
So it's just, I don't know, probably just the way that I was able to stay in there every single time and take it from first point to last.
Yeah, play well.

Q.  How are you feeling physically coming out of the other night?  I think I saw you call for the doctor at some point.
SAMANTHA STOSUR:  Yep.

Q.  You seem great today.
SAMANTHA STOSUR:  Yeah, since probably yesterday lunchtime I felt much, much better.  Yeah, don't really know why I was struggling so much out there.
Yes, like I said yesterday, lunchtime I felt much better.  No problems today at all.  So that's a good thing.

Q.  Do you go into like a US Open because you won it, with a different feeling at all as opposed to other tournaments?
SAMANTHA STOSUR:¬† No, not necessarily.¬† I think, you know, you go into Grand Slams‑‑ you know Grand Slams are a little bit different anyway.¬† There is obviously a lot more hype and things going on and it's just a little bit crazy and manic going into it.
It's important to stick to what things work for you and get everything done that you need to get done.
No, I don't think I'd treat US Open any differently now than before I won it.  I've got to go in there and try and prepare the best I can and hopefully do well.

Q.  You have played Serena on a lot of different stages.  Where is her level do you think right now compared to some other years?  Do you feel like she's a little more vulnerable than she has been in the past?
SAMANTHA STOSUR:  Yeah, I think there are probably times in matches I have either watched or even today you think, Oh, there is a little bit of vulnerability there.
But being the champion she is, second serve she hits it on the line ou wide for an ace to give herself a set point in the first set tiebreak.
But against players like that you think, Oh, there is a chance there.  More often than not they come up with the goods to shut you down.
But I think Serena has been through, you know, obviously a lot in her career.¬† The match I played against her in Charleston ‑ I think it was 2012 ‑ she played unbelievable.¬† Whether that's the best tennis she's ever played, I don't know.
But I think she's obviously capable of great things.  Whether she's there or just below, maybe it doesn't matter because it's what happens at the big moments.

Q.  You seem to bring the best out of each other every time you play.  Most of the time, anyway.  What is it about it from your point of view that sort of lifts you?
SAMANTHA STOSUR:  I just like the challenge.  I mean, I think she is "the" greatest player probably ever.  Why not go out there and try and play your best tennis against someone like that and see where you stack up.
From the first times that we have played each other years ago I have enjoyed that challenge.  I like the way, you know, you've just gotta go after it.  There has been times she's killed me; there's been times I have won.
There has been all sorts of different scenarios, but it's always a good challenge going up against someone like her to say, Okay, I have to play well today to win.

Q.  You come from a rich tennis tradition.  How much do you think former players sort of inspire other generations and players to come forward?  Do you think that has much of an influence or not?
SAMANTHA STOSUR:¬† Yeah, I think it does.¬† If you have somebody, man or woman at the top of a sport, then kids watch and you want to ‑‑you want to see that happen more.¬† I remember there wasn't necessarily a female when I was young, but I remember watching Rafter playing.¬† I was late for school watching him play US Open finals.¬† It does.¬† You remember those moments.
I think it is good, you know, in our countries to have that kind of, whether it's the history or just each kind of each year have someone up there to try and keep breeding and inspire the next generation.¬† I think it does seem to work that way when there's‑‑ I mean, there's always the exceptions, but I think when there is one or two up there, then three or four want to come up, as well.
Yeah, you don't want to get left behind when there's other people up there.

Q.  Do you feel Evonne Goolagong brought more minorities into the sport in Australia?  As a first nation kind of person, did that kind of inspire you think similar people to play tennis?  Did it have any lasting effect?
SAMANTHA STOSUR:  No, I think it did.  It was probably before my time.  But, no, I don't see why it wouldn't have.  I guess she's from the minority in Australia, too.
I mean, what an unbelievable thing that she was able to do to leave home and play and do what she was able to do.  Yeah, I have no doubt it inspired lots of people to play.
Like I said, I'm a little bit later than that, but, yeah, I have had the pleasure of being on court with Evonne at Fed Cup.  You know she's a great champion.  She's a great person.

Q.  What influence did Kerry Melville and Judi Teggart of the Original 9 have on Australian women and Australian players?
SAMANTHA STOSUR:  Yeah, again, that's even further before.  Maybe ask some people older than me.  They could exactly tell you.
But for sure the Original 9 were pivotal to what the tour is today.  We're very lucky that they started it 41 years ago now.
Yeah, we're reaping all the rewards from their tough times and hard work and what they saw, you know, that maybe women's tennis could be.

Q.  They actually were told at the time just not even to come back to Australia because they wouldn't be allowed to play in any events.  Obviously tennis in Australia has grown beyond that.
SAMANTHA STOSUR:  Oh, yeah.  I couldn't imagine being in that position, so it's a big call to say, Okay, can we do this?  Is that really going to happen?
But, yeah, it takes very strong‑willed people to make those decision and carry through with their actions and stand by that for what they thought was the greater cause.

Q.  When you win the point or lose the point, you seem to control your emotions so well.  I was watching your game with other audience, and they said, Wow, she's so quiet.  Never saw any emotion.  Is that in your nature or you have to train to be that way?
SAMANTHA STOSUR:  Yeah, I guess.  It's probably more natural for me to be that way than not, but sometimes it's easy to be like that than not, as well.
So I think today I was playing well.  I knew that I was playing well.  Whether you win or lose a point, I didn't feel like I made too many bad decisions out there, so I can live with that.
I think it's more frustrating for me when I'm out there and making errors on things that I know are the wrong decision or just what I shouldn't be doing.
I think when you're doing the right things it's a lot easier to live with those and keep your emotions under control.

Q.  What is one of the best pieces of practical advice you've gotten that's resonated or stayed with you throughout your career?
SAMANTHA STOSUR:  Just to go out there and play the way you know you can play.  Whether you're playing No. 1 in the world or 1000 in the world, you've got to go out there and impose your style.
The way that I play, I don't want to scrap around the baseline and be dictated to.  I think the more times I can put my tennis onto my opponent, the better chance I've got.  I still have to do that every single day, and sometimes it's harder than other days to do it.
It's probably a good bit of advice that I've been told all the way through my career.  You've got it do it day in and day out.

Q.  Just a question from left field.  We hear quite a lot about the ATP players council, but we don't hear much about the WTA players council.  I understand you're one of the leaders of the council.
SAMANTHA STOSUR:  Well, I'm on the council.

Q.  So just wondering how you feel about your role in the WTA players council.
SAMANTHA STOSUR:  Oh, I'm glad I got on the council.  I've done it for two years now.
Hopefully I will get on it for another two years.  I have enjoyed I guess being part of what is going on.  It is important to our tour, and I think if you can have a little bit of influence and I guess take what all the players feel to these meetings and to discuss it, then I think it's a great thing.
As for whether you hear more about the ATP or WTA, I don't know.  I guess maybe they're a little bit more outspoken.  We just get it done quietly and do what we need to do.

Q.  What are some of the recent things that you have been discussing or working on?
SAMANTHA STOSUR:¬† Oh, things are always changing with what's a, I guess, topic of discussion.¬† But, look, there's lots and lots of topics and lots of things that are getting‑‑ you can't change in one day.¬† It's going to take a little bit of time.
I guess you guys will be able to see maybe what they are in the near future.

Q.  Is this a type of social activism like where you're able to be involved?
SAMANTHA STOSUR:  No, not necessarily.  I just got nominated a couple of years ago and thought it would be interesting to be on it.
You know, I love playing tennis.  I like being a part of it.  I kind of thought, Well, you know what?  If you can be involved in other ways...
I often talk about it anyway.  If you're going to talk about it, why not talk about it in a forum that might actually be able to go somewhere.
Yeah, I think it's a nice thing to be a part of.  You learn how businesses work and what goes on and, yeah, maybe be able to take some views from other players in there and maybe make a difference.

FastScripts Transcript by ASAP Sports




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